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Acknowledgement of country and welcome to conference
Bryce WakefieldZara Kimpton (MC)
  • Bryce Wakefield (National Executive Director of Australian Institute of International Affairs)

    Bryce Wakefield

    National Executive Director of Australian Institute of International Affairs

    Dr Bryce Wakefield is the national executive director of the Australian Institute of International Affairs and a visiting fellow at the Australian National University. He has lived, worked and researched in the United States, Japan, Europe and New Zealand. He trained as a political scientist with particular expertise in International Relations and the international affairs of East Asia.

    From 2008 to 2012 Bryce was the associate responsible for Northeast Asian programs at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. In this role, he was responsible for conceiving, designing and organising around 60 events in Washington, including policy briefings in the U.S. Congress, on political issues in Australia, Taiwan, North and South Korea and Japan. He co-organised, with the Wilson Center’s partners, three major annual policy conferences in Tokyo. He has also given talks in Japanese, including for parliamentarians at the National Diet.

    He was also a university lecturer with tenure in area studies and international relations at Leiden University in the Netherlands. While at Leiden from 2012-2018 he taught numerous classes on the foreign policy and domestic politics of Japan, the politics of East Asia, comparative politics, and the relationship between politics and culture. He designed and implemented a successful specialization on culture and politics for Leiden’s graduate program in International Relations. During his time as a university academic he also delivered training, induction and briefing sessions for Dutch and international diplomats in the Hague and in Japan.

    Bryce is regularly quoted in the media. His work and views on political issues in Asia and Australasia have appeared in such outlets as BusinessWeek, Der Spiegel, Financial Times, SCMP, the Telegraph, de Volkskrant and the Washington Times, as well as on the ABC, ACN, SBS, BBC News, CNBC, CSPAN, 7News Australia, and Sky News Australia and in such Japanese outlets as the Daily Yomiuri, NHK and the Sankei Shimbun. In February 2015, the Tokyo bureau chief of the New York Times named him as one of 10 “influential and reliable intellectuals” outside Washington who could help policymakers better know Japan.

    Bryce’s academic publications to date focus on constitutional issues and defence policy, political marketing and national identity in Japan. While at the Wilson Center, he also edited and contributed to several of the centre’s multi-author publications on East Asian politics and foreign policy. He has also written on New Zealand’s foreign policy and has been called to the Australian Senate Foreign Affairs and Defence References Select Committee to give expert testimony.

    Bryce lived in Japan from 1998 to 2004 and earned his master’s degree from Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy. He earned his PhD in political studies from the University of Auckland.

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  • Zara Kimpton (MC) (National Vice President at Australian Institute of International Affairs)

    Zara Kimpton (MC)

    National Vice President at Australian Institute of International Affairs

    Zara Kimpton OAM is the master of ceremony for the AIIA National Conference. She was appointed National Vice President of the Australian Institute of International Affairs in 2010. She completed her BA in Political Science, Fine Arts and Economics at Melbourne University. She subsequently pursued a career in stockbroking with William Noall & Son in Melbourne, the mining/investment industry with Consolidated Gold Fields Australia in Sydney and banking with Banque Nationale de Paris in Melbourne. She then worked in New York in the interior design industry and later ran her own business in this field in Melbourne. Zara joined the council of the Australian Institute of International Affairs Victoria in 1997 and was President from 2003 to 2006. She was made a life member of AIIAV in 2007. She has been involved in AIIAV study tours to South Africa (1996), Sri Lanka (2003), Russia (2008), Vietnam (2001) and China (2012) and led the tours to South America (2000) and Indonesia (2009). Zara chaired the national Fundraising Task Force in 2007 and is now the National Patron of the Friends of the AIIA. She has also represented the AIIA at conferences in Malaysia, Japan, Republic of Korea and the United Kingdom and in 2017 was a delegate to the Women 20 (W20) summit in Germany. She was the leader of the Australian delegation to the W20 Argentina 2018 summit and the Japan W20 2019 summit. She is currently a joint proprietor of a cattle and sheep station in north-eastern Victoria. Apart from international affairs her main interests are travel, the arts, tennis, horse riding, hiking, and speaking French. In 2011 Zara was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for service to international relations through executive roles with the Australian Institute of International Affairs Victoria.

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Keynote Session
Simon BirminghamDavid McAllisterAllan GyngellGeraldine Doogue
  • Simon Birmingham (Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs)

    Simon Birmingham

    Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs
  • David McAllister (Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs at European Parliament)

    David McAllister

    Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs at European Parliament
  • Allan Gyngell (National President at Australian Institute of International Affairs)

    Allan Gyngell

    National President at Australian Institute of International Affairs
  • Geraldine Doogue (Senior Presenter at ABC)

    Geraldine Doogue

    Senior Presenter at ABC
Morning Tea
New Approaches to Emerging Strategic Challenges
Hugh WhiteHayley ChannerJacqui TrueStan GrantIan Hall

Plenary Session. With a global future looking ever more uncertain, how can we build a national strategy that preserves Australia’s interests and enhances its security? In the eyes of many observers, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has confirmed that the era of globalisation is over and we are again in a world dominated by great power rivalry with often horrific consequences. Are we entering a new era of power politics, and if so, what does Australia’s response need to be? Are we anywhere near understanding the complexity of the threats and challenges the country faces? Or are the critics correct in stating that a focus on military responses to regional issues has limited our strategic imagination? With such measures as “lawfare,” “grey-zone activity,” environmental instability, development strategies and effective diplomacy by potential rivals in our region, and pandemics identified as threats to Australian security, how can Australia best coordinate across its agencies, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, to address its regional security concerns?

  • Hugh White (Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at ANU)

    Hugh White

    Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at ANU
  • Hayley Channer (Senior Policy Fellow at Perth USAsia Centre)

    Hayley Channer

    Senior Policy Fellow at Perth USAsia Centre
  • Jacqui True (Director of Monash University’s Centre for Gender, Peace and Security)

    Jacqui True

    Director of Monash University’s Centre for Gender, Peace and Security
  • Stan Grant (International Affairs Editor at Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Stan Grant

    International Affairs Editor at Australian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Ian Hall (Professor and Acting Director of Griffith Asia Institute)

    Ian Hall

    Professor and Acting Director of Griffith Asia Institute
Lunch
Breakout Sessions
Afternoon Tea
New Ways Forward in the Australia-China Relationship?
Yun JiangGlenda KorporaalRowan CallickNaoise Mcdonagh

Plenary Session. Although Beijing appears to have dialled back on “Wolf Warrior Diplomacy,” Australia’s relations with China are still near their lowest point since normalisation in the 1970s. Yet China remains Australia’s most significant trading partner. How should we best manage the nadir in the relationship, and is rapprochement possible or even desirable? Australia has proven that it can stand up to economic coercion, but with China seeking to diversify and reduce its reliance on mineral imports, will this be the case indefinitely? How should Australia approach issues that China has declared as its “core national interests?” Are there areas, such as climate, where the two nations can cooperate? What effect is our approach to China having on our relations with others in the region? And what can we glean from the 20th National Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party about shifts in China’s foreign policy?

  • Yun Jiang (AIIA China Matters Fellow at Australian Institue of International Affairs)

    Yun Jiang

    AIIA China Matters Fellow at Australian Institue of International Affairs
  • Glenda Korporaal (Writer and Commentator at The Australian)

    Glenda Korporaal

    Writer and Commentator at The Australian
  • Rowan Callick

    Rowan Callick

  • Naoise Mcdonagh (President at Australian Institute of International Affairs South Australia)

    Naoise Mcdonagh

    President at Australian Institute of International Affairs South Australia
Closing Session
Bryce WakefieldGraeme DobellSonia Arakkal
  • Bryce Wakefield (National Executive Director of Australian Institute of International Affairs)

    Bryce Wakefield

    National Executive Director of Australian Institute of International Affairs

    Dr Bryce Wakefield is the national executive director of the Australian Institute of International Affairs and a visiting fellow at the Australian National University. He has lived, worked and researched in the United States, Japan, Europe and New Zealand. He trained as a political scientist with particular expertise in International Relations and the international affairs of East Asia.

    From 2008 to 2012 Bryce was the associate responsible for Northeast Asian programs at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. In this role, he was responsible for conceiving, designing and organising around 60 events in Washington, including policy briefings in the U.S. Congress, on political issues in Australia, Taiwan, North and South Korea and Japan. He co-organised, with the Wilson Center’s partners, three major annual policy conferences in Tokyo. He has also given talks in Japanese, including for parliamentarians at the National Diet.

    He was also a university lecturer with tenure in area studies and international relations at Leiden University in the Netherlands. While at Leiden from 2012-2018 he taught numerous classes on the foreign policy and domestic politics of Japan, the politics of East Asia, comparative politics, and the relationship between politics and culture. He designed and implemented a successful specialization on culture and politics for Leiden’s graduate program in International Relations. During his time as a university academic he also delivered training, induction and briefing sessions for Dutch and international diplomats in the Hague and in Japan.

    Bryce is regularly quoted in the media. His work and views on political issues in Asia and Australasia have appeared in such outlets as BusinessWeek, Der Spiegel, Financial Times, SCMP, the Telegraph, de Volkskrant and the Washington Times, as well as on the ABC, ACN, SBS, BBC News, CNBC, CSPAN, 7News Australia, and Sky News Australia and in such Japanese outlets as the Daily Yomiuri, NHK and the Sankei Shimbun. In February 2015, the Tokyo bureau chief of the New York Times named him as one of 10 “influential and reliable intellectuals” outside Washington who could help policymakers better know Japan.

    Bryce’s academic publications to date focus on constitutional issues and defence policy, political marketing and national identity in Japan. While at the Wilson Center, he also edited and contributed to several of the centre’s multi-author publications on East Asian politics and foreign policy. He has also written on New Zealand’s foreign policy and has been called to the Australian Senate Foreign Affairs and Defence References Select Committee to give expert testimony.

    Bryce lived in Japan from 1998 to 2004 and earned his master’s degree from Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy. He earned his PhD in political studies from the University of Auckland.

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  • Graeme Dobell (Journalist at Australian Strategic Policy Institute)

    Graeme Dobell

    Journalist at Australian Strategic Policy Institute

    A journalist since 1971, Graeme Dobell writes on Australian foreign policy and defence. He is Journalist Fellow with the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, writing a weekly column for ASPI’s digital magazine, The Strategist, since 2013. In 2021, he wrote an intellectual history of ASPI’s work over its first two decades: An informed and independent voice: ASPI, 2001-2021.

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  • Sonia Arakkal (Co-Founder of Think Forward)

    Sonia Arakkal

    Co-Founder of Think Forward

    Sonia Arakkal is co-founder of Think Forward, a think tank focused on intergenerational fairness. Most recently she was a Policy Fellow at the Perth USAsia Centre where she worked on Australia's economic engagement in the Indo Pacific with a special focus on Australia India relations. She was a 2022 delegate to the Australia India Youth Dialogue and comments regularly on Australian TV, print and radio on public policy. She was previously a political staffer for state and federal parliamentarians. Sonia holds a BA in international relations and an LLB with honours from the ANU. She will be undertaking an MBA at INSEAD in 2023.

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